Friday, May 20, 2022

Peach Bottom - AUTOMATIC SCRAM DUE TO ELECTRICAL TRANSIENTS

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission
Operations Center

EVENT REPORTS FOR
05/17/2022 - 05/18/2022

Power Reactor
Event Number: 55899
Facility: Peach Bottom
Region: 1     State: PA
Unit: [2] [] []
RX Type: [2] GE-4,[3] GE-4
NRC Notified By: Linell, Bill
HQ OPS Officer: Brian P. Smith Notification Date: 05/16/2022
Notification Time: 19:51 [ET]
Event Date: 05/16/2022
Event Time: 15:52 [EDT]
Last Update Date: 05/16/2022 Emergency Class: Non Emergency
10 CFR Section:
50.72(b)(2)(iv)(B) - RPS Actuation - Critical
50.72(b)(3)(iv)(A) - Valid Specif Sys Actuation Person (Organization):
Lilliendahl, Jon (R1DO)

Power Reactor Unit Info
Unit SCRAM Code  RX Crit  Initial PWR Initial RX Mode Current PWR  Current RX Mode
2 A/R Y 100 Power Operation 0 Hot Standby
Event Text
AUTOMATIC SCRAM DUE TO ELECTRICAL TRANSIENTS

The following information was provided by the licensee via fax:

"Unit 2 experienced multiple electrical transients resulting in a Group I Primary Containment Isolation Signal (PCIS) isolation and subsequent unit reactor scram. Low reactor water level during the automatic scram caused PCIS Group II and III isolation signals. Following the PCIS Group I isolation, all main steam lines isolated. All control rods inserted and all systems operated as designed."

The following additional information was obtained from the licensee via phone in accordance with Headquarters Operations Officers Report Guidance:

Peach Bottom Unit 2 automatically scrammed from 100 percent power due to an electrical transient and subsequent PCIS Group I isolation (Main Steam Isolation Valve closure). Unit 2 lost main feedwater due to the PCIS Group I isolation, however, all other systems responded as expected following the scram. High Pressure Coolant Injection is maintaining pressure control while Condensate Pumps are maintaining inventory. The unit is currently stable and in Mode 3. Peach Bottom Unit 3's Adjustable Speed Drives were impacted by the electrical transients and the unit reduced power to 98 percent power.

The NRC Resident Inspector was notified.

Sunday, May 8, 2022

May 10th - Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation

Dear CIS & Decommissioning Working Groups,
Meeting info

05/10/22 9:00AM - 12:00PM ET
Commission Meeting: Strategic Programmatic Overview of the Fuel Facilities and the Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation Business Lines [more...]

NRC One White Flint North
11555 Rockville Pike
Rockville MDKellee Jamerson
(301) 415-7408

Participation: Open



Document Title: M220510: Agenda - Strategic Programmatic Overview of the Fuel Facilities and the Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation Business Lines
Document Type: Commission Meeting Agenda
Document Date: 05/10/2022

Document Title: M220510: Slides - Strategic Programmatic Overview of the Fuel Facilities and the Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation Business Lines
Document Type: Commission Meeting Slides
Document Date: 05/10/2022
 

Wednesday, May 4, 2022

NRC Proposes $3,500 Defense Health Agency Fine for Loss of Medical Purpose Radioactive Material

Nuclear Regulatory Commission - News Release
No: I-22-005 May 2, 2022
CONTACT: Diane Screnci, 610-337-5330
                      Neil Sheehan, 610-337-5331
 
NRC Proposes $3,500 Defense Health Agency Fine for Loss of Medical Purpose Radioactive Material

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has proposed a $3,500 civil penalty for a federal agency for the loss of nuclear material used during radiation therapy procedures.
 
The Falls Church, Virginia, Defense Health Agency oversees medical treatment facilities within the Department of Defense, including the Naval Medical Center in San Diego. On May 17, 2021, DHA reported to the NRC the loss of four brachytherapy seeds containing iodine-125 that were to be implanted for prostate cancer treatments at the center.
 
“In weighing the appropriate enforcement action in this case, we took into consideration the comprehensive steps taken by DHA to prevent a repeat occurrence. During a future inspection, we will verify the effectiveness of these changes,” said NRC Region I Administrator Dave Lew.
 
In a Dec. 9, 202, inspection report, the NRC identified the apparent violation. According to the lost source policy described in the NRC Enforcement Policy, a civil penalty is considered for all violations involving the loss of regulated material.
 
DHA believes the seeds, contained in a shielded box, were inadvertently disposed of as normal waste, which have not been recovered despite search efforts. The NRC believes the seeds are unlikely to cause permanent injury to a member of the public if encountered.
 
On Jan. 18, 2022, DHA responded to the inspection report and did not contest the apparent violation. The agency provided comprehensive information regarding corrective and preventative actions for the loss of the seeds, including the cessation of all brachytherapy procedures pending a root cause analysis and the identification of, and implementation of, actions that include revising procedures and enhancing training.
 
DHA will have 30 days to pay or contest the fine.

Friday, April 29, 2022

Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station, Units 2 and 3 - Integrated Inspection Report 05000277/2022001 and 05000278/2022001

Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station, Units 2 and 3 - Integrated Inspection Report 05000277/2022001 and 05000278/2022001

ADAMS Accession No.  ML22117A036

TMI - I, Issuance of Amendment

Zip of three placed into ADAMS today

ML22081A229
https://adamswebsearch2.nrc.gov/webSearch2/main.jsp?AccessionNumber=ML22081A229  

Three Mile Island Unit 1 Issuance of Amendment 304 to Revise License Conditions and the Permanently Defueled Technical Specifications to Align rqts for Permanent Removal of Spent Fuel from Spent Fuel Pool
 
N2
MJK

Tuesday, April 5, 2022

NRC Unveils Look at Four Years of Strategic Planning; Update Includes New Organizational Health and Stakeholder Confidence Goals

Nuclear Regulatory Commission - News Release
No: 21-015 April 4, 2022
CONTACT: Office of Public Affairs, 301-415-8200
 
NRC Unveils Look at Four Years of Strategic Planning;
Update Includes New Organizational Health and Stakeholder Confidence Goals
 
The NRC released today its Strategic Plan for fiscal years 2022–2026, which offers a blueprint for how the agency will plan, implement, and monitor the work needed to ensure the safe and secure use of radioactive materials.
 
The Strategic Plan for 2022-2026 includes an exclusive new focus on the agency’s efforts to continue to foster a healthy organization and inspire stakeholder confidence.
 
“The Strategic Plan will serve the agency over the next four years by providing a defined roadmap that can be used in budget development and the agency’s ongoing implementation of the Foundations for the Evidence Act of 2018,” said NRC Chairman Christopher T. Hanson. “This Strategic Plan will also inform agency decision making regarding major new acquisitions, information technology, strategic human capital planning, evaluations, and other evidence-building and evidence-capacity building investments.”
 
Hanson added that the Strategic Plan identifies goals that include essential strategies to ensure that the agency carries out its critical mission with utmost efficiency and effectiveness.
 
The Strategic Plan is supported by an Evidence-Building Plan, an Annual Evaluation Plan, and a Capacity Assessment, which are new components required by the 2018 Evidence Act. These new components document strategic planning activities and organize evidence-building and evaluation to ensure an integrated and direct connection to evidence needs.
 
The NRC Strategic Plan explains that the enhanced focus on organizational health is vital to ensure the agency can perform as a modern, risk-informed regulator, prepare for an evolving future, improve performance and “achieve mission excellence in a diverse, inclusive and innovative environment.”
 
The Strategic Plan also notes that the NRC must excel in a manner that inspires stakeholder confidence and public trust. It outlines how the agency will promote transparency, provide opportunities for candid and meaningful public participation, and ensure stakeholders have a meaningful role in agency regulatory processes.

22-015.pdf

Thursday, March 31, 2022

NRC OIG Issues an Event Inquiry Report on Findings Regarding Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant

Nuclear Regulatory Commission - News Release
No: 22-012 March 16, 2022
CONTACT: Scott Burnell, 301-415-8200

NRC Issues Findings from NIST Reactor Event Special Inspection

Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff has released its initial conclusions from its special inspection at the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s non-power reactor in Gaithersburg, Maryland. The NRC launched the inspection in February 2021, a few days after an event during startup of the reactor damaged a reactor fuel element and released radioactive material. The agency issued an interim inspection report in April 2021.

The inspectors examined independent analyses of the radiation release and concluded that public health and safety was maintained – any potential dose to the public, while unlikely, would have been a very small fraction of regulatory limits. The inspectors also concluded that doses to the reactor facility staff during the event were well below regulatory limits.

During the inspection, NRC inspectors reviewed NIST’s records from the event, the facility staff’s response, NIST’s root cause analysis, proposed corrective actions and related documentation. They also interviewed NIST staff and management regarding the event and related matters. The inspection found seven apparent violations of NRC requirements, including five violations related to exceeding the fuel temperature safety limit and damaging a fuel element. Other apparent violations are related to emergency planning and equipment modification.

If finalized at their current level, the findings could result in a civil penalty. After reviewing the NRC inspection report, NIST can accept the NRC’s findings, provide additional information in writing or during a regulatory conference, or request alternative dispute resolution. The NRC will consider all available information before making a final determination and document the decision in publicly available correspondence. The report notes several items planned for NRC follow-up. These items will be assessed in supplemental NRC inspections and documented in subsequent inspection reports.

Since the event violated the fuel temperature safety limit, the NRC must formally approve any restart of the reactor, which NIST has requested. The NRC will only consider authorizing restart after the agency has completed reviewing the restart request and has determined that sufficient corrective actions have been implemented to ensure that the facility will be operated safely by the licensee. Increased NRC oversight of the NIST facility will continue after any restart has been authorized.