Wednesday, June 29, 2022

NRC Amends Licensing, Inspection, and Annual Fees for Fiscal Year 2022

Nuclear Regulatory Commission - News Release 
No: 22-023 June 22, 2022
CONTACT: David McIntyre, 301-415-8200

NRC Amends Licensing, Inspection, and Annual Fees for Fiscal Year 2022

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission is amending its regulations for the licensing, inspection, special projects, and annual fees it will charge applicants and licensees for fiscal year 2022.

The FY 2022 final fee rule, published today in the Federal Register, includes fees required by the Nuclear Energy Innovation and Modernization Act necessary to recover, to the maximum extent practicable, approximately 100 percent of the NRC’s total budget authority for FY 2022, less the budget authority for excluded activities. A proposed fee rule was published for public comment on Feb. 23.

The FY 2022 final fee rule reflects a total budget authority of $887.7 million, an increase of $43.3 million from FY 2021. After accounting for exclusions from the fee-recovery requirement and net billing adjustments, the NRC must recover approximately $752.7 million in fees in FY 2022. Of this amount, approximately $198.8 million will be recovered through fees for services (Part 170), and approximately $553.9 million will be recovered through annual fees (Part 171).

Compared to FY 2021, annual fees are decreasing for fuel facilities, spent fuel storage/reactor decommissioning activities, and for a uranium recovery facility licensee. Annual fees are increasing for operating power reactors, non-power production or utilization facilities, the U.S. Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Program, DOE transportation activities, and for 47 materials users fee categories. While the operating power reactors annual fee is increasing in FY 2022, it does not exceed the annual fee cap established by NEIMA. Generally, annual fees are impacted by changes to the budget, fees for services, the number of licensees, and other factors.

The final fee rule also includes a change in the hourly rate charged for services, affecting licensees and applicants. The NRC has increased its hourly rate from $288 to $290 for FY 2022 and has adjusted license application fees accordingly.

The NRC estimates that the FY 2022 annual fees will be paid by the 93 licensees of operating commercial power reactors, three non-power production or utilization facilities, 122 spent nuclear fuel storage and decommissioning reactor facilities, eight fuel cycle facilities, one uranium recovery facility, and approximately 2,500 nuclear materials licensees.

Beaver Valley - OFFSITE AGENCY NOTIFICATION DUE TO CHEMICAL LEAK

 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

Operations Center


EVENT REPORTS FOR
06/21/2022 - 06/22/2022


 55953 

Power Reactor

Event Number: 55953

Facility: Beaver Valley
Region: 1     State: PA
Unit: [1] [] []
RX Type: [1] W-3-LP,[2] W-3-LP
NRC Notified By: Shawn W. Keener
HQ OPS Officer: Bill Gott

Notification Date: 06/21/2022
Notification Time: 16:52 [ET]
Event Date: 06/21/2022
Event Time: 15:47 [EDT]
Last Update Date: 06/21/2022

Emergency Class: Non Emergency
10 CFR Section:
50.72(b)(2)(xi) - Offsite Notification

Person (Organization):
Gray, Mel (R1DO)

Power Reactor Unit Info

UnitSCRAM CodeRX CritInitial PWRInitial RX ModeCurrent PWRCurrent RX Mode
1NY15Power Operation15Power Operation
Event Text

OFFSITE AGENCY NOTIFICATION DUE TO CHEMICAL LEAK

The following information was provided by the licensee via fax or email:

"At 1547 EDT on June 21, 2022, it was determined that Beaver Valley Power Station Unit No. 1 experienced a reportable chemical leak. Approximately 261 gallons of a Sodium Hypochlorite/Sodium Bromine mixture reached the ground and approximately 130.5 gallons (of the 261 gallons) progressed to the Ohio River (via storm drain). The source of the leakage has been isolated and absorbent material has been placed to contain the leakage. Following confirmation of this leakage, notifications were made to the following offsite agencies starting at 1615 EDT:

"National Response Center (Incident Report # 1339391)
"Pennsylvania Department Of Environmental Protection
"Beaver County Emergency Management

"This condition is being reported as a four-hour, non-emergency notification per 10CFR50.72(b)(2)(xi). There was no impact on the health and safety of the public or plant personnel. The NRC Resident Inspector has been notified."

Page Last Reviewed/Updated Wednesday, June 22, 2022

NRC to Meet with U.S. Air Force Officials During Regulatory Conference

Nuclear Regulatory Commission - News Release 
No: IV-22-010 June 21, 2022
Contact: Victor Dricks, 817-200-1128

NRC to Meet with U.S. Air Force Officials During Regulatory Conference

Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff will meet with representatives of the U.S. Air Force on June 30 to discuss apparent violations associated with the use of radioactive materials.

The virtual meeting will begin at 8 a.m. Central time. NRC staff and representatives from the Air Force will meet at the NRC’s Region IV office in Arlington, Texas. The public will be able to observe the meeting via Microsoft Teams or listen by calling 301-576-2978, conference code 728313416#. NRC staff will answer questions from the public before closing the event to public observation to discuss security-related matters.

The NRC identified 14 apparent violations of NRC requirements during inspections conducted Oct. 26-28, 2021, at the Air Force Medical Readiness Agency’s facility in Falls Church, Virginia; and Sept. 27-30 and Oct. 22, 2021, at Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, New Mexico. These inspections reviewed activities authorized under the Department of the Air Force’s Master Materials License.

The apparent violations being considered for escalated enforcement involved: four failures related to the implementation of the Master Materials License; seven failures related to the environmental use of thorium-232 source material at Kirtland Air Force Base; and three failures related to NRC’s security requirements.

During this conference, Air Force officials will have the opportunity to provide their perspective or additional information regarding the apparent violations before the agency makes its final enforcement decision. Air Force officials will also discuss corrective actions taken and planned to address the issues and prevent recurrence.

No decisions will be made during the meeting. The NRC will review the information and finalize its determination in approximately 60 days following the conference, which will be publicly available.

22-010-iv.pdf

Tuesday, June 21, 2022

Distribution Letter to D. Rhoades from A. Snyder - Three Mile Island Unit 1 - Exemption - Use of the Decommissioning Trust Fund for Site Restoration

Date: 06/08/2022

Title: Letter to D. Rhoades from A. Snyder - Three Mile Island Unit 1 - Exemption - Use of the Decommissioning Trust Fund for Site Restoration

To:   - Mr. David P. Rhoades, Constellation Energy

From:   - Amy Snyder, NMSS/DUWP/RDB

Documents in Web-based ADAMS:

   - Letter to D. Rhoades from A. Snyder - TMI Unit 1 - Exemption - Use of Decommissioning Trust Fund for Site Restoration (ML22126A143)https://adamswebsearch2.nrc.gov/webSearch2/main.jsp?AccessionNumber=ML22126A143

   - Enclosure - Exemption  (ML22126A144) https://adamswebsearch2.nrc.gov/webSearch2/main.jsp?AccessionNumber=ML22126A144

To access document(s) please search by accession number using the following link: https://adams.nrc.gov/wba/

Peach Bottom, Units 2 and 3 - Security Baseline Inspection Report 05000277/2022402 and 05000278/2022402 and Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation Security Inspection Report 07200029/2022401 (Cover Letter Only)

Peach Bottom, Units 2 and 3 - Security Baseline Inspection Report 05000277/2022402 and 05000278/2022402 and Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation Security Inspection Report 07200029/2022401 (Cover Letter Only)

ADAMS Accession No.  ML22166A034

PB Sec IR 2022-402 and ISFSI IR 2022-401 PUBLIC.pdf

Saturday, June 11, 2022

Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station, Units 2 and 3 - Emergency Preparedness Biennial Exercise Inspection Report 05000277/2022501 and 05000278/2022501

SUBJECT: PEACH BOTTOM ATOMIC POWER STATION, UNITS 2 AND 3 – EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS BIENNIAL EXERCISE INSPECTION REPORT 05000277/2022501 AND 05000278/2022501

Peach Bottom EP EX IR 2022-501.pdf

Distribution Three Mile Island Station, Unit 1 - Finding of No Significant Impact with the Associated Environmental Assessment Replated to using Decomm Trust Fund for Site Restoration

Date: 06/01/2022

Title: Three Mile Island Station, Unit 1 - Finding of No Significant Impact with the Associated Environmental Assessment Replated to using Decomm Trust Fund for Site Restoration

To:   - Mr. David P. Rhoades, Constellation Energy

From:   - Amy Snyder, NMSS/DUWP/RDB

Documents in Web-based ADAMS:

   - Letter to D Rhoades from A Snyder TMI Unit 1 Finding of No Significant Impact with Associated Environmental Assessment Related to Using Decomm Trust Fund for Site Restoration (ML22126A060) https://adamswebsearch2.nrc.gov/webSearch2/main.jsp?AccessionNumber=ML22126A060 

  - Three Mile Island Unit 1 - Finding of No Significant Impact with the Associated Environmental Assessment Related to Using Decomm Trust Fund for Site Restoration (ML22126A064) https://adamswebsearch2.nrc.gov/webSearch2/main.jsp?AccessionNumber=ML22126A064

To access document(s) please search by accession number using the following link: https://adams.nrc.gov/wba/

Thursday, June 2, 2022

Three Mile Island Sold to Private Equity Group Composed of Sara Lee European Meats, P.F. Chang’s China Bistro, Sur La Table, and TGI Friday, (June 1, 2022)

Three Mile Island Sold to Private Equity Group Composed of Sara Lee European Meats, P.F. Chang’s China Bistro, Sur La Table, and TGI Friday, (June 1, 2022)


Monday, May 30, 2022

NRC Schedules Webinar to Discuss 2021 Safety Performance at Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania Nuclear Power Plants

Nuclear Regulatory Commission - News Release
No: I-22-007 May 26, 2022
CONTACT:
Diane Screnci, 610-337-5330
Neil Sheehan, 610-337-5331

NRC Schedules Webinar to Discuss 2021 Safety Performance at
Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania Nuclear Power Plants

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff will hold a public webinar on June 8 to discuss the agency’s annual assessment of safety performance at nuclear power plants in Maryland, New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania.

The performance of 17 nuclear power reactors will be addressed during the virtual session. They are: Calvert Cliffs 1 and 2, in Lusby, Maryland, operated by Constellation Nuclear; Salem 1 and 2 and Hope Creek, in Hancocks Bridge, New Jersey, operated by PSEG; Nine Mile Point 1 and 2 and FitzPatrick, in Scriba, New York, and Ginna, in Ontario Township, New York, operated by Constellation Nuclear; Beaver Valley 1 & 2, in Shippingport, Pennsylvania, operated by Energy Harbor Nuclear; Susquehanna 1 & 2, in Salem Township, Pennsylvania, operated by Talen Energy; Limerick 1 & 2, in Limerick, Pennsylvania, and Peach Bottom 2 & 3, in Delta, Pennsylvania, operated by Constellation Nuclear.

The purpose of the webinar is to provide information regarding the plants’ safety performance in 2021 and the NRC’s oversight activities at the facilities. The online meeting is scheduled to begin at 5:30 p.m. Eastern time. Participants will be able to access the meeting after completing this registration form. The Microsoft Teams link will then be sent to them. For those without access to the internet, the teleconference number is 301-576-2978, passcode 332395799 #. Attendees will be able to view slides prepared by NRC staff and ask questions either orally or in writing. The slides will be available in the agency’s online documents system known as  .

All of the plants to be discussed operated safely in 2021, with inspection findings and performance indicators for each unit assessed as “green,” or of very low safety significance, at the end of the year. As a result, each of those plants in 2022 will receive the normal level of oversight, which entails thousands of hours of inspection each year.

The Reactor Oversight Process uses color-coded inspection findings and indicators to describe plant performance. The colors start at green and increase to white, yellow or red, commensurate with the safety significance of the issues involved. Inspection findings or performance indicators with more than very low safety significance trigger increased NRC oversight.

Inspections are performed by NRC resident inspectors assigned to each of the plants and specialists from the agency’s Region I Office in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania.

The annual assessment letters for the plants, as well as the webinar notice, are available on the NRC website. Current plant performance indicators for all of the units are also available on the website and are updated on a quarterly basis.

Friday, May 20, 2022

Peach Bottom - AUTOMATIC SCRAM DUE TO ELECTRICAL TRANSIENTS

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission
Operations Center

EVENT REPORTS FOR
05/17/2022 - 05/18/2022

Power Reactor
Event Number: 55899
Facility: Peach Bottom
Region: 1     State: PA
Unit: [2] [] []
RX Type: [2] GE-4,[3] GE-4
NRC Notified By: Linell, Bill
HQ OPS Officer: Brian P. Smith Notification Date: 05/16/2022
Notification Time: 19:51 [ET]
Event Date: 05/16/2022
Event Time: 15:52 [EDT]
Last Update Date: 05/16/2022 Emergency Class: Non Emergency
10 CFR Section:
50.72(b)(2)(iv)(B) - RPS Actuation - Critical
50.72(b)(3)(iv)(A) - Valid Specif Sys Actuation Person (Organization):
Lilliendahl, Jon (R1DO)

Power Reactor Unit Info
Unit SCRAM Code  RX Crit  Initial PWR Initial RX Mode Current PWR  Current RX Mode
2 A/R Y 100 Power Operation 0 Hot Standby
Event Text
AUTOMATIC SCRAM DUE TO ELECTRICAL TRANSIENTS

The following information was provided by the licensee via fax:

"Unit 2 experienced multiple electrical transients resulting in a Group I Primary Containment Isolation Signal (PCIS) isolation and subsequent unit reactor scram. Low reactor water level during the automatic scram caused PCIS Group II and III isolation signals. Following the PCIS Group I isolation, all main steam lines isolated. All control rods inserted and all systems operated as designed."

The following additional information was obtained from the licensee via phone in accordance with Headquarters Operations Officers Report Guidance:

Peach Bottom Unit 2 automatically scrammed from 100 percent power due to an electrical transient and subsequent PCIS Group I isolation (Main Steam Isolation Valve closure). Unit 2 lost main feedwater due to the PCIS Group I isolation, however, all other systems responded as expected following the scram. High Pressure Coolant Injection is maintaining pressure control while Condensate Pumps are maintaining inventory. The unit is currently stable and in Mode 3. Peach Bottom Unit 3's Adjustable Speed Drives were impacted by the electrical transients and the unit reduced power to 98 percent power.

The NRC Resident Inspector was notified.

Sunday, May 8, 2022

May 10th - Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation

Dear CIS & Decommissioning Working Groups,
Meeting info

05/10/22 9:00AM - 12:00PM ET
Commission Meeting: Strategic Programmatic Overview of the Fuel Facilities and the Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation Business Lines [more...]

NRC One White Flint North
11555 Rockville Pike
Rockville MDKellee Jamerson
(301) 415-7408

Participation: Open



Document Title: M220510: Agenda - Strategic Programmatic Overview of the Fuel Facilities and the Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation Business Lines
Document Type: Commission Meeting Agenda
Document Date: 05/10/2022

Document Title: M220510: Slides - Strategic Programmatic Overview of the Fuel Facilities and the Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation Business Lines
Document Type: Commission Meeting Slides
Document Date: 05/10/2022
 

Wednesday, May 4, 2022

NRC Proposes $3,500 Defense Health Agency Fine for Loss of Medical Purpose Radioactive Material

Nuclear Regulatory Commission - News Release
No: I-22-005 May 2, 2022
CONTACT: Diane Screnci, 610-337-5330
                      Neil Sheehan, 610-337-5331
 
NRC Proposes $3,500 Defense Health Agency Fine for Loss of Medical Purpose Radioactive Material

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has proposed a $3,500 civil penalty for a federal agency for the loss of nuclear material used during radiation therapy procedures.
 
The Falls Church, Virginia, Defense Health Agency oversees medical treatment facilities within the Department of Defense, including the Naval Medical Center in San Diego. On May 17, 2021, DHA reported to the NRC the loss of four brachytherapy seeds containing iodine-125 that were to be implanted for prostate cancer treatments at the center.
 
“In weighing the appropriate enforcement action in this case, we took into consideration the comprehensive steps taken by DHA to prevent a repeat occurrence. During a future inspection, we will verify the effectiveness of these changes,” said NRC Region I Administrator Dave Lew.
 
In a Dec. 9, 202, inspection report, the NRC identified the apparent violation. According to the lost source policy described in the NRC Enforcement Policy, a civil penalty is considered for all violations involving the loss of regulated material.
 
DHA believes the seeds, contained in a shielded box, were inadvertently disposed of as normal waste, which have not been recovered despite search efforts. The NRC believes the seeds are unlikely to cause permanent injury to a member of the public if encountered.
 
On Jan. 18, 2022, DHA responded to the inspection report and did not contest the apparent violation. The agency provided comprehensive information regarding corrective and preventative actions for the loss of the seeds, including the cessation of all brachytherapy procedures pending a root cause analysis and the identification of, and implementation of, actions that include revising procedures and enhancing training.
 
DHA will have 30 days to pay or contest the fine.

Friday, April 29, 2022

Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station, Units 2 and 3 - Integrated Inspection Report 05000277/2022001 and 05000278/2022001

Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station, Units 2 and 3 - Integrated Inspection Report 05000277/2022001 and 05000278/2022001

ADAMS Accession No.  ML22117A036

TMI - I, Issuance of Amendment

Zip of three placed into ADAMS today

ML22081A229
https://adamswebsearch2.nrc.gov/webSearch2/main.jsp?AccessionNumber=ML22081A229  

Three Mile Island Unit 1 Issuance of Amendment 304 to Revise License Conditions and the Permanently Defueled Technical Specifications to Align rqts for Permanent Removal of Spent Fuel from Spent Fuel Pool
 
N2
MJK

Tuesday, April 5, 2022

NRC Unveils Look at Four Years of Strategic Planning; Update Includes New Organizational Health and Stakeholder Confidence Goals

Nuclear Regulatory Commission - News Release
No: 21-015 April 4, 2022
CONTACT: Office of Public Affairs, 301-415-8200
 
NRC Unveils Look at Four Years of Strategic Planning;
Update Includes New Organizational Health and Stakeholder Confidence Goals
 
The NRC released today its Strategic Plan for fiscal years 2022–2026, which offers a blueprint for how the agency will plan, implement, and monitor the work needed to ensure the safe and secure use of radioactive materials.
 
The Strategic Plan for 2022-2026 includes an exclusive new focus on the agency’s efforts to continue to foster a healthy organization and inspire stakeholder confidence.
 
“The Strategic Plan will serve the agency over the next four years by providing a defined roadmap that can be used in budget development and the agency’s ongoing implementation of the Foundations for the Evidence Act of 2018,” said NRC Chairman Christopher T. Hanson. “This Strategic Plan will also inform agency decision making regarding major new acquisitions, information technology, strategic human capital planning, evaluations, and other evidence-building and evidence-capacity building investments.”
 
Hanson added that the Strategic Plan identifies goals that include essential strategies to ensure that the agency carries out its critical mission with utmost efficiency and effectiveness.
 
The Strategic Plan is supported by an Evidence-Building Plan, an Annual Evaluation Plan, and a Capacity Assessment, which are new components required by the 2018 Evidence Act. These new components document strategic planning activities and organize evidence-building and evaluation to ensure an integrated and direct connection to evidence needs.
 
The NRC Strategic Plan explains that the enhanced focus on organizational health is vital to ensure the agency can perform as a modern, risk-informed regulator, prepare for an evolving future, improve performance and “achieve mission excellence in a diverse, inclusive and innovative environment.”
 
The Strategic Plan also notes that the NRC must excel in a manner that inspires stakeholder confidence and public trust. It outlines how the agency will promote transparency, provide opportunities for candid and meaningful public participation, and ensure stakeholders have a meaningful role in agency regulatory processes.

22-015.pdf

Thursday, March 31, 2022

NRC OIG Issues an Event Inquiry Report on Findings Regarding Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant

Nuclear Regulatory Commission - News Release
No: 22-012 March 16, 2022
CONTACT: Scott Burnell, 301-415-8200

NRC Issues Findings from NIST Reactor Event Special Inspection

Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff has released its initial conclusions from its special inspection at the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s non-power reactor in Gaithersburg, Maryland. The NRC launched the inspection in February 2021, a few days after an event during startup of the reactor damaged a reactor fuel element and released radioactive material. The agency issued an interim inspection report in April 2021.

The inspectors examined independent analyses of the radiation release and concluded that public health and safety was maintained – any potential dose to the public, while unlikely, would have been a very small fraction of regulatory limits. The inspectors also concluded that doses to the reactor facility staff during the event were well below regulatory limits.

During the inspection, NRC inspectors reviewed NIST’s records from the event, the facility staff’s response, NIST’s root cause analysis, proposed corrective actions and related documentation. They also interviewed NIST staff and management regarding the event and related matters. The inspection found seven apparent violations of NRC requirements, including five violations related to exceeding the fuel temperature safety limit and damaging a fuel element. Other apparent violations are related to emergency planning and equipment modification.

If finalized at their current level, the findings could result in a civil penalty. After reviewing the NRC inspection report, NIST can accept the NRC’s findings, provide additional information in writing or during a regulatory conference, or request alternative dispute resolution. The NRC will consider all available information before making a final determination and document the decision in publicly available correspondence. The report notes several items planned for NRC follow-up. These items will be assessed in supplemental NRC inspections and documented in subsequent inspection reports.

Since the event violated the fuel temperature safety limit, the NRC must formally approve any restart of the reactor, which NIST has requested. The NRC will only consider authorizing restart after the agency has completed reviewing the restart request and has determined that sufficient corrective actions have been implemented to ensure that the facility will be operated safely by the licensee. Increased NRC oversight of the NIST facility will continue after any restart has been authorized.

Thursday, March 17, 2022

NRC Issues Findings from NIST Reactor Event Special Inspection

Nuclear Regulatory Commission - News Release
No: 22-012 March 16, 2022
CONTACT: Scott Burnell, 301-415-8200

NRC Issues Findings from NIST Reactor Event Special Inspection

Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff has released its initial conclusions from its special inspection at the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s non-power reactor in Gaithersburg, Maryland. The NRC launched the inspection in February 2021, a few days after an event during startup of the reactor damaged a reactor fuel element and released radioactive material. The agency issued an interim inspection report in April 2021.

The inspectors examined independent analyses of the radiation release and concluded that public health and safety was maintained – any potential dose to the public, while unlikely, would have been a very small fraction of regulatory limits. The inspectors also concluded that doses to the reactor facility staff during the event were well below regulatory limits.

During the inspection, NRC inspectors reviewed NIST’s records from the event, the facility staff’s response, NIST’s root cause analysis, proposed corrective actions and related documentation. They also interviewed NIST staff and management regarding the event and related matters. The inspection found seven apparent violations of NRC requirements, including five violations related to exceeding the fuel temperature safety limit and damaging a fuel element. Other apparent violations are related to emergency planning and equipment modification.

If finalized at their current level, the findings could result in a civil penalty. After reviewing the NRC inspection report, NIST can accept the NRC’s findings, provide additional information in writing or during a regulatory conference, or request alternative dispute resolution. The NRC will consider all available information before making a final determination and document the decision in publicly available correspondence. The report notes several items planned for NRC follow-up. These items will be assessed in supplemental NRC inspections and documented in subsequent inspection reports.

Since the event violated the fuel temperature safety limit, the NRC must formally approve any restart of the reactor, which NIST has requested. The NRC will only consider authorizing restart after the agency has completed reviewing the restart request and has determined that sufficient corrective actions have been implemented to ensure that the facility will be operated safely by the licensee. Increased NRC oversight of the NIST facility will continue after any restart has been authorized.

Monday, March 14, 2022

Susquehanna Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2 - Request for Withholding Information from Public Disclosure (EPID L-2022-LLA-0005)

SUBJECT:  Susquehanna Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2 - Request for Withholding Information from Public Disclosure (EPID L-2022-LLA-0005)

ADAMS Accession No.  ML22041A441


Using Web-based ADAMS, select “Advanced Search” 
Under “Property,” select “Accession Number”  
Under “Value,” enter the Accession Number
Click Search 

Thursday, March 3, 2022

NRC Seeks Public Comment on Proposed Rule for Decommissioning Nuclear Power Plants

Nuclear Regulatory Commission - News Release
No: 22-010 March 3, 2022
CONTACT: David McIntyre, 301-415-8200

NRC Seeks Public Comment on Proposed Rule for Decommissioning Nuclear Power Plants

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission is seeking public comment on a proposed rule to amend agency regulations for nuclear power plants transitioning from operations to decommissioning.

The proposed rule was published today in the Federal Register. Comments will be accepted for 75 days, through May 17. The proposed rule and related documents are also available on the NRC website, with information about upcoming public meetings to present the proposed rule and receive public comments. Two online public meetings will be held March 21 at 1 p.m., Eastern time and March 31 at 4 p.m., Eastern time. Additional public meetings may be added during the comment period.

Current NRC regulations establish safety requirements for the commercial operation of nuclear power plants. These regulations do not have separate requirements for the significantly lower safety hazards associated with a permanently shut down and defueled reactor undergoing decommissioning. As a result, the NRC has allowed incremental changes to various requirements, including emergency preparedness, through exemptions and license amendments. The proposed rule would implement specific regulatory requirements for different phases of the decommissioning process, consistent with the reduced risk.

The proposed regulation would incorporate lessons learned from plants that have recently transitioned to decommissioning and improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the regulatory framework.

“NRC maintains its rigorous oversight of the decommissioning process from start to finish. said NRC Chairman Christopher T. Hanson. “Seeking and reviewing public comments will further inform the development of the rule to ensure it is protective of public health and safety.”

When the Commission approved the rule in November, Hanson emphasized the importance of public participation in the rulemaking process, noting that the agency sought public comment twice in the years the proposed rule was under development.

Comments can be submitted over the federal government’s rulemaking website, www.regulations.gov, using Docket ID NRC-2015-0070; sent by email to Rulemaking.Comments@nrc.gov; or directly mailed to Secretary, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555-0001, ATTN: Rulemakings and Adjudications Staff.

NRC Proposes $25,600 Fine for Pennsylvania Company

Nuclear Regulatory Commission - News Release
No: I-22-003 March 2, 2022
CONTACT: Diane Screnci, 610-337-5330
Neil Sheehan, 610-337-5331

NRC Proposes $25,600 Fine for Pennsylvania Company

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has proposed a $25,600 civil penalty to a Pennsylvania company for performing work in West Virginia without obtaining approval from the NRC.

Steel City Gamma LLC, based in Daisytown (Washington County), Pennsylvania, conducted industrial radiography activities on Dec. 18, 2019, and between Jan. 1, 2020, and April 9, 2020, at a facility in Pleasant Valley, West Virginia.

Based on an investigation conducted between April 21, 2020, and March 1, 2021, the NRC’s Office of Investigations determined that SCG did not abide by the applicable requirements, including performing the work without a license from Pennsylvania when it was amended to possession and storage only. In addition, the investigation found that the company’s then-owner engaged in deliberate misconduct by knowingly violating regulations pertaining to reciprocity.

On Feb. 3, 2022, the NRC Region I Office conducted a predecisional enforcement conference with SCG to discuss the violations, causes and corrective actions. During this conference, the company’s current owner acknowledged that SCG committed the violations. As a result, the NRC is proposing the fine and a Severity Level II violation. The agency is also issuing an order prohibiting the firm’s former owner from participating in NRC-licensed activities for five years because of deliberate misconduct.

The violations did not result in any actual safety or security consequences.

“The failure to follow NRC requirements prior to using NRC-licensed materials is unacceptable,” said NRC Region I Administrator David Lew. “We cannot permit any violations of NRC regulations to interfere with the protection of public health and safety.”

Industrial radiography involves the use of a device containing nuclear material to check for cracks or flaws in materials that would not otherwise be visible. Applications can include the testing and grading of welds on pressurized piping, high-capacity storage containers and pipelines.

As an NRC “Agreement State,” Pennsylvania oversees the use of nuclear materials within its borders that would otherwise be regulated by the NRC. Under a reciprocity requirement, if Agreement State-licensed materials are used in a state where nuclear materials are regulated by the NRC, including West Virginia, approval must first be obtained from the agency.

The firm, which no longer has a nuclear materials license from Pennsylvania, will have 30 days to provide a written response, which must include steps it has taken or plans to take to address the issue.

Peach Bottom Nuclear Plant, Unit Nos. 2 And 3-Site Walkdown For The Review Of Plant Information To Perform A Risk Analysis In Accordance With LIC-504, Integrated Risk-Informed Decision-making For Emergent Issues, Regarding High Energy Arcing Faults

SUBJECT:  Peach Bottom Nuclear Plant, Unit Nos. 2 And 3-Site Walkdown For The Review Of Plant Information To Perform A Risk Analysis In Accordance With LIC-504, Integrated Risk-Informed Decisionmaking For Emergent Issues,Regarding High Energy Arcing Faults

ADAMS Accession No.  ML22039A075

Using Web-based ADAMS, select “Advanced Search”
Under “Property,” select “Accession Number”
Under “Value,” enter the Accession Number
Click Search 

Tuesday, March 1, 2022

Ukraine's Nuclear Plants: Back ground articles


Read more about IAEA concerned for safety of Ukraine's nuclear plants; calls for restrain on Business Standard. IAEA has called on all parties to refrain from any actions that could threaten the safety and security of nuclear power plants in Ukraine amid an intensified Russian military offensive in capital Kyiv

The Russian military on Saturday released images of the Chernobyl nuclear plant in Ukraine that it seized after President Vladimir Putin launched an invasion of the country this week.

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine presents an unprecedented challenge for the country’s electrical utilities: How to maintain safety of its 15 operating reactors amid the chaos of war. “We’ve ...

Germany is weighing whether to extend the life-span of its remaining nuclear power plants as a way to secure the country's energy supply in the face of uncertainty over Russian gas supplies, the ...

Information note on nuclear power installations in Ukraine. As events unfold in Ukraine, the NEA collects information from verifiable and reliable sources to support its members’ efforts to maintain an understanding of the state of nuclear safety and radiological protection in that country.

Russia appears to have begun a new phase of its Ukraine invasion by pummelling airfields, gas pipelines and a radioactive waste site overnight. Troops have also entered the country’s second ...

Nuclear waste disposal site outside Kyiv hit by a Russian missile strike. According to local Ukrainian news website BNO, in the early hours of this Sunday, February 27, Russian missiles made a direct hit just outside the capital Kyiv, on a nuclear waste disposal site.. A report on their website said, ‘As a result of the mass bombing of Kyiv with all types of anti-aircraft and missile weapons ...

Thursday, February 24, 2022

Constellation Energy Generation, LLC - Request for Additional Information Regarding Fleet License Amendment Request to Adopt TSTF-541

Subject:  Constellation Energy Generation, LLC - Request for Additional Information Regarding Fleet License Amendment Request to Adopt TSTF-541

ADAMS Accession No.:  ML22041B536


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Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station, Units 2 and 3 - Issuance of Amendment Nos. 341 and 344 Re: Change to Technical Specification 5.5.7, Ventilation Filter Testing Program (EPID L-2021-LLA-0078)

Subject:  Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station, Units 2 and 3 - Issuance of Amendment Nos. 341 and 344 Re:  Change to Technical Specification 5.5.7, Ventilation Filter Testing Program (EPID L-2021-LLA-0078)

ADAMS Accession No.:  ML22004A258


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NRC Proposes to Amend Licensing, Inspection, and Annual Fees for Fiscal Year 2022

Nuclear Regulatory Commission - News Release
No: 22-008 February 23, 2022
CONTACT: David McIntyre, 301-415-8200

NRC Proposes to Amend Licensing, Inspection, and Annual Fees for Fiscal Year 2022

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission is seeking public comment on proposed changes to the licensing, inspection, special projects, and annual fees it would charge applicants and licensees for fiscal year 2022.

This year’s proposed fee rule, published today in the Federal Register, reflects a total budget authority of $887.7 million, an increase of $43.3 million from FY 2021. This is based on the FY 2022 Congressional Budget Justification, as a full-year appropriation has yet to be enacted. If the NRC receives an appropriation with a different budget authority, these amounts will be reflected in the final fee rule to be published this summer.

Under the Nuclear Energy Innovation and Modernization Act, the NRC is required to recover nearly all of its total budget authority in FY 2022, except for specific excluded activities. NEIMA also established a new cap for operating reactor annual fees and required three sets of actions related to invoices for service fees.

After accounting for the exclusions from the fee-recovery requirement and net billing adjustments, the NRC must recover approximately $752.2 million in fees in FY 2022. Of this amount, approximately $188.9 million will be recovered through Part 170 fees for service and $563.3 million through Part 171 annual fees.

Compared to FY 2021, proposed annual fees would decrease for fuel facilities and the agency’s lone uranium recovery licensee. Annual fees would increase for operating power reactors, spent fuel storage/reactor decommissioning activities, non-power production or utilization facilities, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Program, DOE transportation activities, and for 44 materials users fee categories. Even with the proposed increase, the operating power reactors annual fee would not exceed the cap established by NEIMA.

The proposed fee rule includes several other changes affecting licensees and applicants. The NRC’s hourly rate for services would increase from $288 to $291, and license application fees would adjust accordingly. In addition, the proposed rule would implement a public interest exemption and not assess fees for import and export licensing activities in FY 2022.

The Federal Register notice includes detailed instructions on how to submit written comments on the proposed rule. Comments will be accepted through March 25.

NRC OIG Releases Two Reports on Findings Regarding Counterfeit, Fraudulent, and Suspect Items in U.S. Nuclear Power Plants

NRC OIG Releases Two Reports on Findings Regarding
Counterfeit, Fraudulent, and Suspect Items in U.S. Nuclear Power Plants

ROCKVILLE, MD—Today, the Office of the Inspector General (OIG), Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued two reports on its audit and investigation findings regarding concerns that counterfeit, fraudulent, and suspect items (CFSI) are present in most, if not all, U.S. nuclear power plants. 

The OIG found that CFSI are present in operating plants, but the extent of CFSI is unknown because the NRC does not require licensees to track CFSI unless a situation rises to the level of being a significant condition adverse to quality, despite concern in the nuclear community about the potential dangers of CFSI. 

The OIG recommended that the NRC should improve its oversight of CFSI by clarifying and communicating how the agency collects, assesses, and disseminates information regarding CFSI, and by improving staff awareness of CFSI and its applicability to reactor inspections.

“The simultaneous issuance of these two reports represents the first time that our Audits and Investigations Divisions have collaborated so closely on a reporting program of this magnitude,” said NRC Inspector General Robert J. Feitel.  “These comprehensive reports are but one example of a new era for the OIG, where our superb teams of auditors and investigators will continue to work together in an integrated way, to fulfill our mission to ensure the integrity, efficiency and effectiveness of the NRC.”

The OIG reports also identified potential gaps in the NRC’s regulatory framework, such as those resulting from a 2011 NRC working group that have since not been resolved. 

The OIG has sent these reports to the NRC’s executive leadership for review and response.  The OIG has a responsibility to independently and objectively conduct audits and investigations to help improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the NRC’s programs and operations.

PR_CFSI_021022.pdf​​​​​​​ 

Thursday, February 17, 2022

Exelon SPIN: Commission Memorandum and Order (CLI-22-01)

In the Matter of
​​​​​​​
EXELON GENERATION COMPANY, LLC;
EXELON CORPORATION; EXELON
FITZPATRICK, LLC; NINE MILE POINT
NUCLEAR STATION, LLC; R.E. GINNA
NUCLEAR POWER PLANT, LLC; and
CALVERT CLIFFS NUCLEAR POWER
PLANT, LLC

E220214t015923_CLI-22-01 Final Order.pdf

Thursday, February 10, 2022

Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station, Units 2 and 3 - Integrated Inspection Report 05000277/2021004 and 05000278/2021004

SUBJECT: PEACH BOTTOM ATOMIC POWER STATION, UNITS 2 AND 3 – INTEGRATED INSPECTION REPORT 05000277/2021004 AND 05000278/2021004

Monday, February 7, 2022

Technical Review: TMI's Request for Water to Cleanup Nuclear Plants, (TMI-Alert, 1/3/22) -- SRBC RESPONSE - DOCUMENTS ATTACHED

TMI's Request for Water to Cleanup Nuclear Plants, (TMI-Alert, 1_3_22).pdf

Exelon - Three Mile Island (2021-054, 2021-055, 2021-056) Response Letter to Eric Epstein on 1-3-22 Comments 02-04-2022.PDF

Constellation Energy Generation, LLC - Issuance of Amendments Related to Order Approving Transfer of Licenses

Subject:  Braidwood, Byron, Calvert Cliffs, Clinton, Dresden, FitzPatrick, LaSalle, Limerick, Nine Mile, Peach Bottom, Quad Cities, Ginna, Salem, Three Mile - Issuance of Amendments Related to Order Approving Transfer of Licenses (EPID L-2022-LLM-0000) (Letter)

ADAMS Accession No.:  ML22021B659


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Subject:  Braidwood, Byron, Calvert Cliffs, Clinton, Dresden, FitzPatrick, LaSalle, Limerick, Nine Mile, Peach Bottom, Quad Cities, Ginna, Salem, Three Mile - Issuance of Amendments Related to Order Approving Transfer of Licenses (EPID L-2022-LLM-0000) - Enclosure 1

ADAMS Accession No.:  ML22021B660