Friday, October 6, 2017

NRC Preparing for Hurricane Irma

Nuclear Regulatory Commission - Press Release
No: II-17-044 September 8, 2017
Contact: Roger Hannah, 404-997-4417
Joey Ledford, 404-997-4416

NRC Preparing for Hurricane Irma

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has dispatched additional inspectors to the Turkey Point nuclear plant south of Miami and the St. Lucie nuclear plant on the east coast of Florida in advance of Hurricane Irma. The NRC expects to activate its regional incident response center in Atlanta, Ga., on Saturday as the agency prepares for the effects of the hurricane on those nuclear plants and other NRC- licensed facilities near the path of the storm.

The Turkey Point plant staff declared an unusual event, the lowest of the NRC emergency classifications, late Thursday evening when a hurricane warning was issued for South Florida. The NRC expects the St. Lucie plant staff to also declare an unusual event when that plant site is included in an expanded hurricane warning area.

In preparing for Hurricane Irma, the staff at Turkey Point, St. Lucie and other plants in the Southeast are working through severe weather procedures, including ensuring that all loose debris and equipment has been removed or secured and conducting walk-downs of important systems and equipment.

The NRC is satisfied that these actions will adequately protect the public during this hurricane.
NRC inspectors are verifying that all of the preparations have been completed, and the plants’ emergency diesel generators are available to be used if the storm affects off-site power supplies.

The NRC has additional inspectors in Florida now, and is also prepared to dispatch region- based inspectors or inspectors from unaffected plants to other sites in the region, should it become necessary.

From the NRC Region II incident response center in Atlanta, NRC staff members will monitor Hurricane Irma while remaining in contact with plant operators, NRC on-site inspectors, the NRC’s headquarters operations center, and state emergency officials in Florida and other potentially affected states.

The NRC inspectors will remain at the nuclear plant sites and the incident response center will remain staffed until the agency is assured that the storm no longer poses a risk to these facilities.

For more information on NRC’s response to Hurricane Irma please visit NRC’s Blog.

New Edition of NRC Information Digest Now Available Online

Nuclear Regulatory Commission - Press Release
No: 17-039 September 6, 2017
CONTACT: Ivonne Couret, 301-415-8200

New Edition of NRC Information Digest Now Available Online

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has published its 2017-2018 edition of the Information Digest, which describes the agency's responsibilities and activities and provides general information on nuclear-related topics. This edition, NUREG-1350, Volume 29, is intended to serve as a quick reference to major facts about the agency and the industry it regulates, in an easy-to-use format that includes visual aids.

The Information Digest is published annually and is available electronically on the

In addition, a print or CD copy will be available in November 2017, upon written request to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Administration, Publications Branch, Washington, D.C. 20555-0001. Requests can also be sent by email to distribution.resource@nrc.gov, or by fax to 301-415-2289.

Peach Bottom: Security Inspection Report 05000277/2017403 and 05000278/2017403

Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station, Units 2 and 3 - Security Inspection Report 05000277/2017403 and 05000278/2017403
ADAMS Accession No.  ML17248A190

TMIA to Screen the "Atomic States of America" at the Midtown on September 19, 2017

Three Mile Island Alert
315 Peffer Street
Harrisburg, PA 17102
 
 N E W S   R E L E A S E

For Immediate Release        Eric Epstein, (717)-635-8615
             epstein@efmr.org

   The Atomic States of America to Play at the      
Midtown Cinema in Harrisburg

The directors of a documentary that garnered rave reviews 
at the Sundance Film Festival will bring their film to Harrisburg’s 
Midtown Cinema on Tuesday September 19, 2017. The event
is sponsored  by Three Mile Island Alert (tmia.com).

The Atomic States of America journeys to nuclear reactor 
communities around the country to provide a comprehensive 
exploration of the history and impact of nuclear power and to 
investigate the truths and myths about  nuclear energy. The film 
introduces people who have been on the front lines of this issue
for decades, including community advocates, journalists, physicists, 
nuclear engineers, NRC inspectors, and former government officials. 

Among those planning to attend include co-directors Don Argott
 and Sheena M. Joyce, and David A. Lochbaum, Director of the Nuclear 
Safety Project for  the Union of Concerned Scientists. 

Seating is limited. Tickets are available from the Midtown Cinema.
 
  
WHAT: Showing of the film The Atomic States of America.
WHEN: Tuesday, September 19 , 2017 at 7:00 p.m.
WHERE: Midtown Cinema, 250 Riley Street, Harrisburg.


Synopsis:

In 2010, the United States announced the first new nuclear power plant 
construction in over 32 years. The 'Nuclear Renaissance' was born, and 
America's long-stalled expansion of nuclear energy was infused with new 
life. The Atomic States of America takes the viewer on a journey to reactor 
communities around the country, and seeks to explore the truths and myths
 of nuclear power. From the gates of Three Mile Island, to the cooling ponds 
of Braidwood, IL, this film introduces the viewer to people who have been 
on the front lines of this issue for decades. 


Begun more than a year before  the disaster in Japan, the deeply investigated
documentary gains a unique  before and after perspective, and includes 
interviews with - Nuclear  Regulatory  Commission inspectors, community 
advocates, investigative  journalists,renowned physicists, nuclear engineers,
 and former government leaders. As the nation stands at the crossroads 
of the Nuclear Renaissance,  The Atomic States of America seeks to inspire
an honest dialogue about  whether or not man can responsibly split the atom.

Run time: 1hr 32min

TMIA to Screen the "Atomic States of America" at the Midtown on September 19, 2017

Three Mile Island Alert
315 Peffer Street
Harrisburg, PA 17102
 
 N E W S   R E L E A S E

For Immediate Release        Eric Epstein, (717)-635-8615
             epstein@efmr.org

   The Atomic States of America to Play at the      
Midtown Cinema in Harrisburg

The directors of a documentary that garnered rave reviews 
at the Sundance Film Festival will bring their film to Harrisburg’s 
Midtown Cinema on Tuesday September 19, 2017. The event
is sponsored  by Three Mile Island Alert (tmia.com).

The Atomic States of America journeys to nuclear reactor 
communities around the country to provide a comprehensive 
exploration of the history and impact of nuclear power and to 
investigate the truths and myths about  nuclear energy. The film 
introduces people who have been on the front lines of this issue
for decades, including community advocates, journalists, physicists, 
nuclear engineers, NRC inspectors, and former government officials. 

Among those planning to attend include co-directors Don Argott
 and Sheena M. Joyce, and David A. Lochbaum, Director of the Nuclear 
Safety Project for  the Union of Concerned Scientists. 

Seating is limited. Tickets are available from the Midtown Cinema.
 
  
WHAT: Showing of the film The Atomic States of America.
WHEN: Tuesday, September 19 , 2017 at 7:00 p.m.
WHERE: Midtown Cinema, 250 Riley Street, Harrisburg.


Synopsis:

In 2010, the United States announced the first new nuclear power plant 
construction in over 32 years. The 'Nuclear Renaissance' was born, and 
America's long-stalled expansion of nuclear energy was infused with new 
life. The Atomic States of America takes the viewer on a journey to reactor 
communities around the country, and seeks to explore the truths and myths
 of nuclear power. From the gates of Three Mile Island, to the cooling ponds 
of Braidwood, IL, this film introduces the viewer to people who have been 
on the front lines of this issue for decades. 


Begun more than a year before  the disaster in Japan, the deeply investigated
documentary gains a unique  before and after perspective, and includes 
interviews with - Nuclear  Regulatory  Commission inspectors, community 
advocates, investigative  journalists,renowned physicists, nuclear engineers,
 and former government leaders. As the nation stands at the crossroads 
of the Nuclear Renaissance,  The Atomic States of America seeks to inspire
an honest dialogue about  whether or not man can responsibly split the atom.

Run time: 1hr 32min

TMIA to Screen the "Atomic States of America" at the Midtown on September 19, 2017

Three Mile Island Alert
315 Peffer Street
Harrisburg, PA 17102
 
 N E W S   R E L E A S E

For Immediate Release        Eric Epstein, (717)-635-8615
             epstein@efmr.org

   The Atomic States of America to Play at the      
Midtown Cinema in Harrisburg

The directors of a documentary that garnered rave reviews 
at the Sundance Film Festival will bring their film to Harrisburg’s 
Midtown Cinema on Tuesday September 19, 2017. The event
is sponsored  by Three Mile Island Alert (tmia.com).

The Atomic States of America journeys to nuclear reactor 
communities around the country to provide a comprehensive 
exploration of the history and impact of nuclear power and to 
investigate the truths and myths about  nuclear energy. The film 
introduces people who have been on the front lines of this issue
for decades, including community advocates, journalists, physicists, 
nuclear engineers, NRC inspectors, and former government officials. 

Among those planning to attend include co-directors Don Argott
 and Sheena M. Joyce, and David A. Lochbaum, Director of the Nuclear 
Safety Project for  the Union of Concerned Scientists. 

Seating is limited. Tickets are available from the Midtown Cinema.
 
  
WHAT: Showing of the film The Atomic States of America.
WHEN: Tuesday, September 19 , 2017 at 7:00 p.m.
WHERE: Midtown Cinema, 250 Riley Street, Harrisburg.


Synopsis:

In 2010, the United States announced the first new nuclear power plant 
construction in over 32 years. The 'Nuclear Renaissance' was born, and 
America's long-stalled expansion of nuclear energy was infused with new 
life. The Atomic States of America takes the viewer on a journey to reactor 
communities around the country, and seeks to explore the truths and myths
 of nuclear power. From the gates of Three Mile Island, to the cooling ponds 
of Braidwood, IL, this film introduces the viewer to people who have been 
on the front lines of this issue for decades. 


Begun more than a year before  the disaster in Japan, the deeply investigated
documentary gains a unique  before and after perspective, and includes 
interviews with - Nuclear  Regulatory  Commission inspectors, community 
advocates, investigative  journalists,renowned physicists, nuclear engineers,
 and former government leaders. As the nation stands at the crossroads 
of the Nuclear Renaissance,  The Atomic States of America seeks to inspire
an honest dialogue about  whether or not man can responsibly split the atom.

Run time: 1hr 32min

PEACH BOTTOM: INSPECTION (REPORT 05000277/2017005 AND 05000278/2017005)

UPDATED INSPECTION PLAN FOR PEACH BOTTOM ATOMIC
POWER STATION UNITS 2 AND 3 (REPORT 05000277/2017005 AND
05000278/2017005)
 
ADAMS Accession No.  ML17236A030

SUSQUEHANNA: REPORT 05000387 2017005 AND 05000388 201700)

UPDATED INSPECTION PLAN FOR SUSQUEHANNA STEAM ELECTRIC
STATION UNITS 1 AND 2 (REPORT 05000387/2017005 AND 05000388/2017005)
 
ADAMS Accession No. ML17236A032

TMI Inspection Plan (REPORT 05000289/2017005)

UPDATED INSPECTION PLAN FOR THREE MILE ISLAND STATION, UNIT 1
(REPORT 05000289/2017005)
 
ADAMS Accession No. ML17240A015

Peach Bottom Inspection Report No. 05000171/2017009


Exelon Generation Company, LLC, Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station Unit 1 - NRC Inspection Report No. 05000171/2017009

ADVISORY: U.S. Renewables in Statistical Dead Heat with Nuclear Power

For Release:  Monday - August 28, 2017 @ 6:00 am (eastern time)
 
Contact:         Ken Bossong, 301-270-6477 x.11;  sun-day-campaign@hotmail.com
                        Tim Judson, 301-270-6477 x.12;  timj@nirs.org
 
Washington DC  The latest issue of the U.S. Energy Information's (EIA) "Electric Power Monthly" (with data through June 30, 2017) reveals that renewable energy sources (i.e., biomass, geothermal, hydropower, solar - inc. small-scale PV, wind) remain in a statistical dead heat with nuclear power vis-à-vis their respective shares of the nation's electrical generation, with each providing roughly 20% of the total. [1]

During the six-month period (January - June), renewables surpassed nuclear power in three of those months (March, April, and May) while nuclear power took the lead in the other three. In total, according to EIA's data, utility-scale renewables plus small-scale solar PV provided 20.05% of U.S. net electrical generation compared to 20.07% for nuclear power. However, renewables may actually hold a small lead because while EIA estimates the contribution from  distributed PV, it does not include electrical generation by distributed wind, micro-hydro, or small-scale biomass.

EIA has acknowledged the neck-in-neck status of nuclear power and renewables and stated as much in a news release it issued in early summer. However, the agency simultaneously stressed its view that "nuclear will generate more electricity than renewables for all of 2017." [2]

Well, maybe ....  maybe not.

While renewables and nuclear are each likely to continue to provide roughly one-fifth of the nation's electricity generation in the near-term, the trend line clearly favors a rapidly expanding market share by renewables compared to a stagnating, if not declining, one for nuclear power. Electrical output by renewables during the first half of 2017 was 16.34% higher than for the same period in 2016 whereas nuclear output dropped by 3.27%. In the month of June alone, electrical generation by renewable sources was 27.15% greater than a year earlier whereas nuclear output dipped by 0.24%.

In fact, almost all renewable energy sources are experiencing strong growth rates. Comparing the first six months of 2017 to the same period in 2016, utility-scale + small-scale solar has grown by 45.1%, hydropower by 16.1%, wind by 15.6%, and geothermal by 3.2%. Biomass (inc. wood and wood-derived fuels) has remained essentially unchanged - slipping by 0.8%. Electrical generation by solar alone is now greater than that provided individually by biomass, geothermal, and oil (i.e., petroleum liquids + petroleum coke).

And on the capacity front, renewables long ago eclipsed nuclear power. For the first half of 2017, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commissions reports that renewables' share of total U.S. available installed generating capacity is 19.70% compared to 8.98% for nuclear -- i.e., more than double. [3]

Finally, last month's cancellation of the Summer 2 and 3 reactors in South Carolina and Duke Power's subsequent decision to pull the plug on construction of the twin William Lee reactors (also in South Carolina) means the growing gap between renewables and nuclear will accelerate at an even faster clip in the coming years. In addition, the possible cancellation of the uneconomic Vogtle 3 and 4 reactors in Georgia would mean no new nuclear coming online for the foreseeable future, as reactor closures continue. In fact, counting possible additional closures and cancellations, retirements could very likely exceed additions. [4]

"Everyone loves a horse race," noted Ken Bossong, Executive Director of the SUN DAY Campaign.  "However, the smart money is now on renewables to soon leave nuclear power in the dust."

"Nuclear power is in irreversible decline in the U.S., due to rising costs and failing economics of new and existing reactors, alike," said Tim Judson, executive director of the Nuclear Information and Resource Service. "Last month's cancellation of half the new reactors under construction in the U.S. means that gap is going to be wider than projected, and accelerating."
# # # # # # # # # #

[1] EIA released its most recent "Electric Power Monthly" report on August 24, 2017.
The full report may be found at: https://www.eia.gov/electricity/monthly.
The most relevant data cited in this release may be found in, or is derived from, the following tables:
https://www.eia.gov/electricity/monthly/epm_table_grapher.php?t=epmt_es1a 
and
https://www.eia.gov/electricity/monthly/epm_table_grapher.php?t=epmt_es1b

[2] See EIA statement: "Monthly renewable electricity generation surpasses nuclear for the first time since 1984" (July 6, 2017)
https://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.php?id=31932

[3] FERC issued its most recent "Energy Infrastructure Update" report on August 3, 2017. See table titled " Total Available Installed Generating Capacity" at https://www.ferc.gov/legal/staff-reports/2017/jun-energy-infrastructure.pdf .  Note that generating capacity is not the same as actual generation. Electrical production per MW of available capacity (i.e., capacity factor) for renewables is often, but not always, lower than that for fossil fuels and nuclear power.

[4] Planned reactor closures through 2025:
2018: Palisades (Michigan - 811 MW)
2019: Pilgrim (Massachusetts - 688 MW); Oyster Creek (New Jersey - 637 MW); Three Mile Island, Unit 1 (Pennsylvania - 829 MW)
2020: Indian Point, Unit 2 (New York - 1,029 MW)
2021: Indian Point, Unit 3 (New York - 1,040 MW)
2024: Diablo Canyon, Unit 1 (California - 1,118 MW)
2025: Diablo Canyon, Unit 2 (California - 1,122 MW)
TOTAL Capacity Retirements: 7,274 MW

** Planned reactor additions:
2016: Watts Bar, Unit 2 (Tennessee - 1,150 MW)
????: Vogtle, Unit 3 (Georgia - 1,117 MW) - delayed, cancellation under review
????: Vogtle, Unit 4 (Georgia - 1,117 MW) - delayed, cancellation under review
TOTAL Capacity Additions: 3,384 MW (as few as 1,150 MW possible)

Possible reactor closures:
2022 or later: Millstone, Unit 2 (Connecticut - 882 MW)
2022 or later: Millstone, Unit 3 (Connecticut - 1,198 MW)
????: Davis-Besse (Ohio - 889 MW)
????: Perry (Ohio - 1,231 MW)
????: Beaver Valley, Unit 1 (Pennsylvania - 911 MW)
????: Beaver Valley, Unit 2 (Pennsylvania - 904 MW)
TOTAL Additional Retirements: 6,015 MW

Susquehanna - Inspection Report 05000387/2017405 AND 05000388/2017405

SUSQUEHANNA STEAM ELECTRIC STATION, UNITS 1 AND 2 –
PROBLEM IDENTIFICATION AND RESOLUTION CYBER SECURITY
INSPECTION REPORT 05000387/2017405 AND 05000388/2017405
 
ADAMS Accession No.  ML17237A016

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Inspector General Reports

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of the Inspector General, recently issued a new report, OIG-17-A-23-Audit of NRC's 10 CFR 2.206 Petition Review Process. To view this report issued by the office please click here
To view other reports issued by the Office of the Inspector General, please click here. 

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Op-ed: Three Mile Island By the Numbers, What Exelon Won’t Tell You

Dear Editor:

Exelon has been targeting the media, elected officials, 
and the public with doomsday predictions regarding the 
closure of Three Mile Island Unit-1. Their numbers are 
misleading, don’t add up, and fail to account for the 
$1.1 billion rate payers were charged to build Three Mile
Island, the $987 million rate payers and taxpayers were
billed to defuel TMI-2, and the $5.26 billion in stranded
costs Exelon collected from rate payers to bailout their 
nuclear fleet as a result of deregulation.

When considering more bail out money for Three Mile 
Island, please remember the following numbers:

History of Three Mile Island Unit-1, (1966-2016)

History of Three Mile Island Unit-1: PDF

Wolf Administration To Distribute Free Potassium Iodide August 24 for Pennsylvanians Near the State’s Five Nuclear Power Plants


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
August 10, 2017

Wolf Administration To Distribute Free Potassium Iodide August 24 for Pennsylvanians Near the State’s Five Nuclear Power Plants

Harrisburg, PA – As part of its annual distribution to replace expired potassium iodide, or KI tablets, the Department of Health will offer free tablets on Thursday, August 24, to Pennsylvanians who live or work within 10 miles of the state’s five nuclear power plants. Those picking up tablets will receive specific instructions on site from community health nurses on how many pills they should receive.
“Potassium iodide is an important part of emergency preparedness for residents who live or work within 10 miles of a nuclear facility in the case of an radiological emergency,” Acting Secretary of Health and Physician General Dr. Rachel Levine said. “It can help protect the thyroid gland against harmful radioactive iodine and is safe for pregnant women, children and infants. It’s important to remember potassium iodide should only be taken when told to do so by state health officials or the governor, and is not a substitute for evacuation in the case of an emergency at our nuclear facilities.”
KI can be taken by anyone, as long as they are not allergic to it. It is safe for pregnant women and those who are breastfeeding, people on thyroid medication, children and infants. Individuals who are unsure if they should take potassium iodide should ask a health care provider.
Individuals can get KI tablets for other family members or those who are unable to get it on their own. Directions detailing when to take the tablets and how to store it are provided with the KI, and Department of Health staff will be available to assist those with questions.
School districts and employers within the 10-mile radius can make arrangements with the Department of Health to obtain their supply of tablets.
The Department of Health also has KI tablets available year-round at county and municipal health departments or state health centers for individuals who live or work near a power plant.
The state’s five nuclear facilities are closely regulated, secure and well-maintained. The facilities are: Beaver Valley Power Station; Limerick Generating Station; Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station; Susquehanna Steam Electric Station; and Three Mile Island Generating Station.
Additional information on KI tablets and nuclear power plant safety can be found on the Department of Health’s website at www.health.pa.gov or follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

MEDIA CONTACT:  April Hutcheson, 717-783-1787 or RA-DHPressOffice@pa.gov
#  #  #

EDITOR’S NOTE:
KI tablets will be distributed between 2:00 PM and 7:00 PM unless otherwise noted on August 24 at the locations below. No appointments are necessary.
Beaver Valley Power Station
  • Beaver Valley Mall – Center at the Mall, 570 Beaver Valley Mall Blvd., Monaca
Limerick Generating Station
  • Kimberton Fire Hall, 2276 Kimberton Road, Phoenixville
  • Keystone Steam Fire Company, 240 North Walnut St., Boyertown
  • Montgomery County Health Department - 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM, Pottstown Health Center, Montgomery County Department of Health and Human Services, 364 King St., Pottstown
Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station
  • East Drumore Township Municipal Building, 925 Robert Fulton Highway., Quarryville
  • Peach Bottom Community Center, 5 Pendyrus St. Delta, PA 17314
Susquehanna Steam Electric Station
  • Butler Township Community Center, 411 West Butler Drive, Drums
  • Luzerne County Community College – Educational Conference Center, 1333 South Prospect St., Nanticoke
  • Salvation Army Community Corps Building, 320 W 2nd St., Berwick
Three Mile Island Generating Station
  • Fairview Township Fire Department, 340 Lewisberry Road, New Cumberland
  • Hummelstown Fire Hall, 249 E. Main St., Hummelstown
  • Manchester Township Municipal Building, 3200 Farmtrail Road, York
  • Masonic Villages – Salon 2, Freemasons Cultural Center, One Masonic Drive, Elizabethtown
  • Middletown Borough Building, 60 W. Emaus St., Middletown

NRC Issues Confirmatory Order to Westinghouse Columbia Fuel Facility

Nuclear Regulatory Commission - Press Release
No: II-17-040 August 11, 2017
Contact: Roger Hannah, 404-997-4417
Joey Ledford, 404-997-4416

NRC Issues Confirmatory Order to Westinghouse Columbia Fuel Facility
The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued a confirmatory order to Westinghouse Electric Company that addresses issues stemming from a 2016 event at the company’s Columbia, S.C., fuel fabrication facility.

In May 2016, plant employees discovered an accumulation of uranium-bearing material in a scrubber system, which is designed to remove unwanted material from a number of plant processes. After an analysis showed the amount of uranium exceeded safety limits, the NRC launched an inspection and later issued a confirmatory action letter, or CAL, which outlined a series of corrective actions. Some of those actions have been completed and others have been incorporated into the new confirmatory order.

The NRC conducted additional inspections last fall and identified several violations of NRC requirements. Westinghouse officials chose to participate in the NRC Alternative Dispute Resolution process, and the order is the result of a settlement under that process. The NRC ADR process is facilitated by a neutral third party with no decision-making authority who assists the NRC and the licensee in reaching an agreement when there are differences regarding an enforcement action. A mediation session between the NRC staff and Westinghouse was held May 19 and discussions between the two parties continued until early August. The order captures the details of the settlement reached during those discussions.

Under the order, Westinghouse has taken and agreed to take a number of corrective actions, including a survey of the safety culture among employees at the site, improvements and modifications to scrubbers and other systems to minimize the likelihood of a similar accumulation, and development of additional methods to provide early indications of abnormal accumulations.


In consideration of the commitments contained in the order, the NRC will not issue a civil penalty or cite the company for the violations, although Westinghouse officials acknowledged that the violations occurred. The company has also agreed to provide the NRC with a notification letter once it has completed the terms of the order and the basis for concluding that the order has been satisfied.

TMI: INTEGRATED INSPECTION REPORT


THREE MILE ISLAND STATION, UNIT 1 – INTEGRATED INSPECTION REPORT 05000289/2017002

DEP Chronicles Story of Susquehanna River Stresses and Cites Successes on New Interactive Multimedia Website

COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA 
Dept. of Environmental Protection

Commonwealth News Bureau 
Room 308, Main Capitol Building 
Harrisburg PA., 17120 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
08/8/2017
CONTACT: 
Deborah Klenotic, DEP
717-783-9954

 
DEP Chronicles Story of Susquehanna River Stresses and Cites Successes on New Interactive Multimedia Website 


Harrisburg, PA – Fans of the Susquehanna River can learn about adverse human impacts on the East Coast’s longest river and its tributaries and follow the progress of the Department of Environmental Protection’s (DEP’s) efforts to tackle them on a new interactive, multimedia website called the Susquehanna River Story.

“Working with many partners, we’re developing and implementing programs that are paying off in addressing the wide range of challenges the Susquehanna faces,” said DEP Secretary Patrick McDonnell. “These are informed by innovative pollution assessment methods and stores of data we’ve developed that have made us a national leader in large-river monitoring.”

DEP has played an instrumental role in improving the health of the Susquehanna River Basin. For example, as a direct result of DEP acid mine drainage cleanup projects, the West Branch Susquehanna River—which was biologically dead about 15 years ago—now has aquatic life from near Clearfield to Lock Haven, including the return of healthy populations of native mussels from Sunbury to Williamsport.

The Susquehanna River Story website uses GIS maps, videos, charts, and photos to show where mining, agriculture, stormwater, and dams have impaired macroinvertebrate, fish, and plant life, as well as DEP’s progress in addressing these impairments. DEP research on smallmouth bass is also shared.

Site visitors can see which streams have been impaired by farming activities as well as samples of agricultural best management practices that have been implemented to repair impacts and which streams have been impaired by acid mine drainage and locations of successful treatment projects. 

DEP has developed innovative continuous in-stream monitoring protocols to analyze water quality. Water samplers and computerized monitoring devices are left in the river for months to enable DEP to continually detect chemicals and other pollutants that would be difficult to discover with conventional testing methods. 

These devices have enabled DEP to collect a great volume of data, including probably more data than any other state environmental agency on contaminants of emerging concern, such as certain hormones, pharmaceuticals, and pesticides. 

Although initiatives to restore water quality and aquatic life in the Susquehanna have had positive results, the river continues to face many challenges from human activity. DEP will chronicle new developments as it works toward a fully healthy Susquehanna River.

Interactive river story websites are also planned for the Delaware, Ohio, Great Lakes, and Potomac River Basins in Pennsylvania.

Peach Bottom: Request for Additional Information

Peach Bottom Units 2 and 3 - Request for Additional Information - TSTF-542 Amendment Request (CACs MF9138 and MF9139)


Peach Bottom - Integrated Inspection Report & Exercise of Enforcement Discretion

PEACH BOTTOM ATOMIC POWER STATION – INTEGRATED INSPECTION REPORT
  05000277/2017002 AND 05000278/2017002 AND EXERCISE OF ENFORCEMENT DISCRETION

Susquehanna: Integrated Inspection Report & Exercise of Enforcement Discretion

SUSQUEHANNA STEAM ELECTRIC STATION –
NTEGRATED INSPECTION REPORT 05000387/2017002 AND 05000388/2017002
AND EXERCISE OF ENFORCEMENT DISCRETION


Tuesday, July 18, 2017

'Advanced' Grid Hackers Targeting Nuclear Plants

Energywire, by Blake Sobczak, July 7, 2017
and

A sophisticated group of hackers has taken aim at U.S. energy, nuclear and manufacturing firms in recent weeks. Cyberattacks recently breached a dozen or more U.S. power plants, including conventional and nuclear generators. The Wolf Creek Nuclear Operating Corp. was among the companies targeted by the hacking campaign. That company, jointly owned by three different energy firms, runs a nuclear power facility near Burlington, Kansas. The North American Electric Reliability Corp. has warned grid operators about an "advanced persistent threat," which is jargon for a well-resourced hacking campaign typically backed by a nation-state. Bloomberg reports that Russia is a chief suspect in the hacking, though some analysts warn attribution is premature. The NERC alert came on the heels of a separate report from the Department of Homeland Security and FBI. That document outlined active hacking threats to the nuclear, electricity and manufacturing industries, among others. Lloyd's of London has estimated the potential impacts of a successful attack on the U.S. power grid, and concluded the total economic loss could range from $243 billion up to $1 trillion in the most damaging scenarios.

EXELON TO RETIRE THREE MILE ISLAND GENERATING STATION IN 2019

Contact:
Paul Adams
Corporate Communications
410-470-4167

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE




EXELON TO RETIRE THREE MILE ISLAND GENERATING STATION IN 2019
Focus is on site employees and community as lack of state and federal energy policies that properly value zero-emissions energy drives decision
CHICAGO (May 30, 2017) — Exelon Corporation today said it will prematurely retire its Three Mile Island Generating Station (TMI) on or about September 30, 2019, absent needed policy reforms. Officials met with employees and informed community leaders, and pledged continued open dialogue as they prepare for this transition.
“Today is a difficult day, not just for the 675 talented men and women who have dedicated themselves to operating Three Mile Island safely and reliably every day, but also for their families, the communities and customers who depend on this plant to produce clean energy and support local jobs,” said Chris Crane, Exelon president and CEO. “Like New York and Illinois before it, the Commonwealth has an opportunity to take a leadership role by implementing a policy solution to preserve its nuclear energy facilities and the clean, reliable energy and good-paying jobs they provide. We are committed to working with all stakeholders to secure Pennsylvania’s energy future, and will do all we can to support the community, the employees and their families during this difficult period.”
Exelon is taking the first steps to shut down the nuclear plant, including:
·         Informing key stakeholders, which will include sending PJM a deactivation notice and making permanent shutdown notifications to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission within 30 days;
·         Immediately taking one-time charges of $65-110 million for 2017, and accelerating approximately $1.0-1.1 billion in depreciation and amortization through the announced shutdown date;
·         Terminating capital investment projects required for long-term operation of TMI; and
·         Canceling 2019 fuel purchases and outage planning, impacting about 1,500 outage workers.
Absent policy reforms, the loss of Pennsylvania nuclear plants would increase air pollution, compromise the resiliency of the electric grid, raise energy prices for consumers, eliminate thousands of good-paying local jobs and weaken the state’s economy.
Despite producing 93 percent of the Commonwealth’s emissions-free electricity and avoiding 37 million tons of carbon emissions — the equivalent of keeping 10 million cars off the road every year — nuclear power is not included in the state’s Alternative Energy Portfolio Standard (AEPS). Yet 16 clean power sources including solar, wind and hydro energy are supported by this state energy policy.
Amending the AEPS is one of many potential solutions to preserve Pennsylvania’s nuclear plants. Other options include establishing a zero emissions credit program, similar to the approach being implemented in Illinois and New York. Exelon is committed to working with its stakeholders to find the best solution for Pennsylvania — one that will maintain nuclear energy’s $2 billion annual contribution to the state’s economy and its approximately 16,000 direct and indirect Pennsylvania jobs.
TMI directly employs 675 workers and contracts another 1,500 local union workers for refueling outages. The station provides more than $1 million in state property taxes and more than $300,000 in local community giving each year.

Exelon’s highly trained employees will continue to operate the plant at world-class levels of excellence, with staff transitions expected within six months of the plant’s final shut down.